Česká centra, Czech Centres

Česká centra / Czech centres - logo

News

All news

Bretislav Pojar: The Master of Puppet Animation; Screentalk + Selection of Animation

5 JULY 2011 at 7 PM. Czech director and animator Bretislav Pojar will introduce and discuss a selection of his award winning animated films. Pojar, a close colleague of acclaimed animator Jiri Trnka, is considered a pioneer in puppet animation, famed for his ability to imbue his many characters with a level of dramatic expression that is magical to behold. The following films will be shown: One Glass Too Many (awarded at 1954 IFF Cannes, Edinburgh, Oberhausen), The Lion and the Song (awarded at 1960 MFF Annency, Montevideo), A Few Words of Introduction (awarded 1962 MFF Bergamo, Oberhausen, Locarno, Melbourne), Romance (awarded at MFF Locarno, Melbourne), Darwin Antidarwin or What the Worm Didn't Suspect (cut-out animation, no commentaries, coulour, 7'), Nightingale / The Romance from the Darkness (awarded at MFF Odense, Esponho, Rio de Janeiro). 112 mins. Barbican Centre, London EC2Y, Box Office: 020 7638 8891.

A timely focus on one of the most important Czech animators and a close colleague of acclaimed animator Jirit Trnka, Bretislav Pojar. This is an unmissable opportunity to hear the celebrated director talk about his work and a rare chance to see some of Pojar’s groundbreaking and award winning films, followed by a Q&A with the director and his producer Michal Podhradsky. 

Bretislav Pojar – The Master of Puppet Animation + Q&A PG*
A timely focus on one of the most important Czech animators and an unmissible opportunity to hear the celebrated director talk about his work.
A close colleague of acclaimed animator Jiri Trnka, Břetislav Pojar began his apprenticeship at the AFIT (Studio of Film & Special Effects) in 1942, where he worked on a number of Trnka’s films.  A pioneer in puppet animation at the Czech Animation School, within ten years Pojar was a master of animation in his own right, famed for his ability to imbue his many characters with a level of dramatic expression that is magical to behold.  According to Pojar, animation is akin to hypnotism - “When someone isn’t much of a hypnotist, the puppet moves. When he is good, the puppet lives his life like each of us.”
This is a rare chance to see some of Pojar’s groundbreaking and award winning films, followed by a Q&A with the director and his producer Michal Podhradsky.

A Drop Too Much
Described by Pojar as “step into the unknown”, A Drop too Much represented the first push down his own creative path and caught the attention of the animation world, with prizes from Cannes, Edinburgh and more. Stopping at an inn on his way to see his girlfriend, a young motorcyclist can’t resist joining in with a wedding toast, with dramatic consequences. 
Czechoslovakia 1953, puppet animation, 19 min.

The Lion and the Song
This multi-award winning, utterly beautiful film is a lyrical allegory for the struggle of art against power, in which a travelling harlequin encounters a fearsome lion in the desert. An unmissible animation classic.
Czechoslovakia 1959, puppet animation, 15min.

A Few Words of Introduction
Pojar’s wickedly humourous satire pokes gentle fun at a speechmaker so enamoured with the sound of his own voice, he is oblivious to the effect he is having on his audience. Pojar details their bafflement, fidgets, whispers and snores with great imagination.
Czechoslovakia 1962, puppet animation, 11 min.

Romance
A coquettish young woman looking for love and happiness changes her mind - and her devotees - in the rhythm of twist. Action and soundtrack are one in this smooth and sultry gem.
Czechoslovakia 1962, puppet (relief), 14min.

Darwin/Anti-Darwin or What the Rain Worm Didn’t Suspect
Although a famous puppeteer, Pojar was also a skilled 2D artist as this pointed satire shows.  A tragi-comic paraphrasing of Darwin's theory of evolution, in which a worm evolves into man and then wishes it hadn’t.  
Czechoslovakia 1969, cut-out animation, 7 min.

Nightangel / The Romance from the Darkness
A young man is obsessed with a mysterious angelic spirit, and following a tragic accident, finds solace in her love. Made during Pojar’s time as one of the Canadian Film Board animators, this partnership with colleague Jacques Drouin is a seamless blend of puppet animation and the rarely used pin screen technique, mixing realism with evocative, dreamlike imagery. 
Czechoslovakia, Canada 1986, puppet, pin screen, 18 min.